Jun 12, 2021

The Substance of Heaven



Today’s great feast day of Corpus Christi, reminds us that the bread that he gives us, is not the stuff that fills our stomach. He feeds us through his eternal priesthood – by the sacrifice of his body and blood he offers to his Father on our behalf. This is what priesthood is – like Melchizedek, offering sacrifice.    


The bread and wine that we place on this altar, counts for little – it is little.  But in the hands of Christ the eternal priest, it becomes his own life-giving body and blood – Christ becomes our food in the wilderness of the world. 


This is by no means allegorical, or a metaphor. Time and space as we experience it, blocks our vision of what angels and the saints of heaven perceive. From our perspective, we have only a temporal reference point to look towards - the visual of bread and wine. But when we do what the Lord commanded us to do at his Last Supper, the eternal God enters time and place at the coordinates of this altar. The bread and wine we place upon it are, by God's power and design, brought into complete and perfected union with the resurrected and eternal Christ. In such a unique encounter between heaven and earth, between time and eternity, our bread and wine have no choice but to “evolve” in to the first fruits of the new creation,  the resurrected Body and Blood of Jesus Christ who, in all his power and glory, intercedes for us before the throne of our heavenly Father. 


Even though from here, we can not see, nor taste this substance of heaven on earth, when we eat and drink of the Eucharistic elements, our frail and broken bodies are guided, locked into communion with Christ's body and blood in heaven. This can be as painful as it is beautiful. Painful, because Holy Communion alerts us to our unworthiness, our sinfulness - we are imperfect, unfinished. It is beautiful because the gift of Holy Communion gives us hope that we, and all of creation, will be brought to our finality in Christ himself.


In the meantime, as people of faith and hope, as children of Abraham we journey through this world with the expectation that it will blossom with new life, that all creation with eventually be changed into the substance of Christ himself. As we wait in joyful hope, let us be ever more conscious of our deepest hunger for the Bread that feeds and satisfies angels and heavenly saints - the Bread of Eternity, Christ himself and approach this altar with holy fear, gratitude and thanksgiving for the greatest gift heaven can give us on earth.

Today’s great feast day of Corpus Christi, reminds us that the bread that he gives us, is not the stuff that fills our stomach. He feeds us through his eternal priesthood – by the sacrifice of his body and blood he offers to his Father on our behalf. This is what priesthood is – like Melchizedek, offering sacrifice.    


The bread and wine that we place on this altar, counts for little – it is little.  But in the hands of Christ the eternal priest, it becomes his own life-giving body and blood – Christ becomes our food in the wilderness of the world. 


This is by no means allegorical, or a metaphor. Time and space as we experience it, blocks our vision of what angels and the saints of heaven perceive. From our perspective, we have only a temporal reference point to look towards - the visual of bread and wine. But when we do what the Lord commanded us to do at his Last Supper, the eternal God enters time and place at the coordinates of this altar. The bread and wine we place upon it are, by God's power and design, brought into complete and perfected union with the resurrected and eternal Christ. In such a unique encounter between heaven and earth, between time and eternity, our bread and wine have no choice but to “evolve” in to the first fruits of the new creation,  the resurrected Body and Blood of Jesus Christ who, in all his power and glory, intercedes for us before the throne of our heavenly Father. 


Even though from here, we can not see, nor taste this substance of heaven on earth, when we eat and drink of the Eucharistic elements, our frail and broken bodies are guided, locked into communion with Christ's body and blood in heaven. This can be as painful as it is beautiful. Painful, because Holy Communion alerts us to our unworthiness, our sinfulness - we are imperfect, unfinished. It is beautiful because the gift of Holy Communion gives us hope that we, and all of creation, will be brought to our finality in Christ himself.


In the meantime, as people of faith and hope, as children of Abraham we journey through this world with the expectation that it will blossom with new life, that all creation with eventually be changed into the substance of Christ himself. As we wait in joyful hope, let us be ever more conscious of our deepest hunger for the Bread that feeds and satisfies angels and heavenly saints - the Bread of Eternity, Christ himself and approach this altar with holy fear, gratitude and thanksgiving for the greatest gift heaven can give us on earth.

Expectations and Hope

This weekend, having listened to God’s Word I want us to now reflect on expectations, and on the virtue of hope.  Consider the miracles perf...